man is the warmest place to hide.

eighties horror you might have missed

the entity

In 1984, Charles Bernstein composed the score for Wes Craven's A Nightmare on Elm Street and established what is probably the most recognizable theme of 80s horror film. During his music career, Charles has worked on over 100 films (in a variety of genres), won an Emmy, scored a documentary about Maya Lin, taught courses at USC and UCLA, and written two books on film music. Quentin Tarantino has used cues from his scores in Kill Bill Vol.1 and Inglorious Basterds. Some of the other horror films he has scored include: The Entity (highly recommended), Deadly Friend (which we discussed a few weeks ago), April Fools Day, and Cujo. Charles was kind enough to take some time to discuss his score for A Nightmare on Elm Street with us, including some details about the synthesizers and unique sound design he used to construct it...

In 1983, Wizard Video started a short-lived division called Wizard Video Games, capitalizing on a brief boom in third-party Atari games that started with Activision's defeat of an Atari lawsuit in 1982 and ending with the the video game crash of 1983. Wizard only managed to release two games, both based on iconic horror films: The Texas Chainsaw Massacre and Halloween...